450 Interviews, 116 Children, 1 Grateful Team

Updated: Oct 27

Our little team of seven Americans and four Haitians had finally made it to the village. Four of us had an unexpected overnight delay in Miami, so we were all grateful to be together, starting the very full two weeks that would be ahead of us. We sat in the notably warm Upper Team House together and talked about our missions for the trip.


One of our top priorities was to register the sponsored children for school. Another top priority was to find out how each of the 63 village families were faring and which of them needed family sponsorships.


We knew that what had to be done meant personally talking to each of the approximately 450 members of the Merci’ de Dieu Village.


In our hands we had a stack of forms that had been sent ahead of us for each family in the village to fill out. Each form included basic information that would help us keep records and begin to know better how to help the families – information such as correct name spellings, and birth dates and grade levels of children.


We ended our team meeting that night, eager to begin the tasks, excited to get to the know the families better, and wonderfully naive about how intense the next few days were going to be.


The following days were completely full. We started early and worked late. It was a delight to get to know the families, learn their stories, hear their needs, and talk to them about Christ.


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Joey, Jullie and JC doing a family interview in the Upper Team House



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Everyone wanted to be a part of the interviews and photos


Each team member knew his or her job and did it well. The unity displayed among everyone was an answer to prayer and a beauty to behold.


Two interview teams worked simultaneously, while Pastor Etienne kept things moving – as soon as one family interview was complete, Pastor Etienne had the next family ready and waiting. Dr. John floated between groups and answered a myriad of questions from the interview teams. Jessi spent time investing in the groups of children who loved to be around a